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  • Writer's pictureJames Lush

How to not give a sh!t presentation (pt2)

So, my last post clearly struck a nerve! Either we've seen too many sh!t presentations or we're very conscious we don't want to be tarred with the same brush! And so, as promised here are more suggestions to shift the dial - for you to be remembered for all the right reasons!




But first, whether you're presenting on stage or virtually there is something I really need you to think about! Do YOU want to be the one that stands out from the pack? If the answer to that is no, read no more! Just carry on doing what you're doing, oblivion is knocking!


However, if you sense there is a tremendous opportunity (given everyone else is so sh!t) to really have impact, make a real difference and to see you and your business become true superstars, then here are another ten little random golden nuggets for you to play with:


  1. Your opening moments are critical. Whether you like it or not, you're being judged. It's the subtle cues that give the game away and that's why it's so important you convey composure, confidence, calmness (even if you're not feeling it). Tell yourself you've got this, you're the expert, you look amazing and you've done all the hard work. Now just go and enjoy the experience!

  2. Once up in front of your audience, take a second! Smile, pause, deliver!

  3. Practice your opening few lines - they're so important! If you've fully prepared you will convey authority and conviction. You'll instantly feel better, your confidence will build and your audience will be in the palm of your hands.

  4. Never ever apologise for being in front of your audience! "Sorry, Kate couldn't be here today so you've got me!" No, sorry, you've lost your audience before you even started - you are the stand in, not the expert! I'm already checked out!

  5. Project your voice. Don't be timid - your audience will buy in to your anxiety and mirror it! Once again, be bold - throw your voice out there. Your audience want you to succeed! Remember that! "Can you hear me at the back" is a pretty dumb question by the way!

  6. Get away from the lectern if you possibly can. It's a barrier, a thing that comes between you and your audience. Sure it takes more effort and practice but the difference between lectern or no lectern is HUGE! And you know it!

  7. Get in to the "we" mode asap! It's not a you and them, it's an us, together. To do this a few well chosen rhetorical questions can do the trick. "How many of you here today have..., put your hands in the air if you've ever wondered why"...

  8. Your first slide - PLEASE make it a good one! It sets the tone. If I see bullet points, sentences or worse still paragraphs, I'm out! Seriously if you wanted to put all those words on the screen you might as well have emailed me!

  9. We cannot read your text AND listen to you. Contrary to popular belief this is multitasking that is physically impossible. So it's one or the other! You make your choice. If you're going big on words, then keep quiet! Otherwise I'm uncertain as to whether you want me to listen to you or read your slides. But an image...

  10. A picture paints a thousand words remember! And an image allows you the freedom to say as much or as little as you want! You don't have to refer to all 15 bullet points because there are none. So, you might forget something or other, who cares! Your audience didn't know it was there in the first place. But a beautiful image complements what you're saying. There is harmony. Your audience can breathe and absorb!

Obviously there are way more golden nuggets to come but for now please help yourself to any of the above! Sprinkle a few of these liberally through your next outing and you'll notice a big difference. But if you sense that a bit of guidance could help, it's amazing what a bit of practical training can do! To find out more about the introductory, intermediate or advanced individual/group training sessions please click here!




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